Thank you to all our summer camps and Science Teams!

Wow, it has been the fastest summer yet! Kindergarten to 8th grade kids from across the country participated in two WhaleTimes’ virtual research missions. They danced to DNA, made vaquita wind socks, and created elephant seal tags. The kids also dazzled the Science Team members with their knowledge and challenged them with thought-provoking questions during the 30+ Skype™ sessions.

Our Creep into the DEEPEND Summer Camp program took kids to the deep sea in the Gulf of Mexico with the DEEPEND Science Team. They met cool animals and even cooler research and researchers while discovering  DEEPEND Consortium’s important deep-sea research.

Kids joined Patrick W. Robinson,  Dave Weller, Barbara Taylor,  Daniel Costa and their Science Teams from the UC-Santa Cruz, Costa Lab, UC Año Nuevo Island Reserve and Southwest Fisheries Science Center/NOAA (vaquita and gray whale research) as part of our Celebration of Conservation: Gray Whales, Elephant Seals, and Vaquita. Summer camp kids learned about the beautiful gray whale, the amazing elephant seal, and the shy vaquita. The kids heard the successful conservation stories of the elephant seal and gray whale. Conservation efforts that saved both species from extinction. Summer campers also learned that the vaquita’s conservation story is still being written. With less than 30 vaquita left, we don’t know if it’ll have a happy ending or not.

Through both WhaleTimes’ programs our summer camp kids learned two important lessons. 1) Everybody makes a difference when it comes to conservation; 2) Everyone can help save ocean animals by only buying and/or eating sustainably caught seafood (when you are hankering for seafood).

Thank you to our Science Team Members, volunteers, and the museums and science centers for making it another amazing summer!

  • DEEPEND Research and Creep into the DEEPEND program funded by funded by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GOMRI) award number GOMRI2014-IV-914
  • The Celebration of Conservation Elephant Seal Team’s research funded in part by: The Office of Naval Research, Joint Industry Program, Año Nuevo Reserve; gray whale and vaquita research supported by Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries. The education program portion funded by WhaleTimes and supported by volunteer time and effort from the Science Teams themselves and WhaleTimes’ volunteers.

Thank you to our museum and science centers for letting us make a splash at your summer camps!

If you missed your chance to join us at a summer camp near you, the program will be back next year.

   

Vaquita Update June 2017: Next Step

Fifty vaquitas left, no, thirty, wait…seven more found dead in the last few months. The news is bleak for vaquitas as the population continues to decline.

A vaquita is a porpoise and the most endangered whale  in the world. Less than 30 survive.

Efforts to stop illegal fishing of the (critically endangered) totoaba and use of gillnets has been at the forefront of scientists and the Mexican Government. Unfortunately, vaquitas (and totoabas) continue to die. With the latest CIRVA report, scientists now believe the only way to save vaquita from extinction is to try to capture the porpoises and put them in safety away from gillnets. “The Mexican government and its conservation partners have organized a live capture effort to try to save the vaquita from extinction….” Read more in this Vaquita Update (courtesy of the Oregon Coast Aquarium.

When you eat seafood, and only eat or buy sustainable seafood.  Find out how: What is Sustainable?

Are you doing everything you can to protect the ocean? Take the 30 Days to a Sustainable You Survey and find out.

The power to protect ocean animals like the vaquita is in your hands.

 

Celebration of Conservation SUMMER CAMPS!

NEW! Celebration of Conservation Summer Camps.  This summer, museums and science centers throughout the country will offer WhaleTimes’ Celebration of Conservation: Gray Whales, Elephants Seals, and Vaquita Summer Camps. 

Our  Celebration of Conservation highlights three important marine conservation stories – two successful stories and one still being written.  As part of TEAM VAQUITA, students learn about gray whales, elephant seals, and vaquita.  Gray whales and elephant seals were once so close extinction it’s amazing either species survived. Due to protection efforts and public awareness, both species are thriving. Both have been delisted (removed) from the endangered species list.  Vaquita, a kind of porpoise, needs that same kind of happy ending. It is the most endangered whale in the world. There are only 30 vaquita left in the world.

To register or find out more, check out the list below and contact the museum or science center near you.

Adventure Science Center Nashville, Tennessee
Catawba Science Center Hickory, North Carolina
Liberty Science Center Jersey City, New Jersey
Maine Discovery Museum Bangor, Maine
Museum of Discovery and Science Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network Newport, Oregon
Pacific Science Center Seattle, WA
St. Louis Science Center St. Louis, Missouri
Tallahassee Museum Tallahassee, Florida
Univ of Michigan Museum of Natural History Ann Arbor, Michigan
Museum of Discovery and Science Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

 

     

Video: Whale Behaviors

Hello Virtual Science Team Members!

The team at Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network has created an excellent video about whale behaviors for you. This installment of Oceanscape Network’s Science in Seconds provides footage of common whale behaviors you can observe from the water’s surface, whether you’re on a boat or watching whales from shore. Enjoy!

Thanks Oceanscape! And, Virtual Science Team Members, don’t forget to visit the Oceanscape Network at: oceanscape.aquarium.org

Jake, the SeaDog

WhaleTimes

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Baleen and Toothed Whales

Our Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation Mission is under way!

A gray whale is a baleen whale. A killer whale is a toothed whale. What’s the difference? This installment of Oceanscape Network’s Science in Seconds provides footage and information about the differences between baleen and toothed whales. Enjoy!

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Gray Whales…arriving soon!

Join WhaleTimes, Southwest Fisheries Science Center/NOAA and the Oceanscape Network, for Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation, a Virtual Research Mission that connects gray whale biologists with students, teachers, and the public. This event runs April 20 to May 1, 2015.

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News Splash: Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network…

WhaleTimes and Oregon Coast Aquarium Bring Ocean Research to the Classroom!

It’s time for kids of all ages to become an ocean explorer, adventurer, and scientist without getting wet! WhaleTimes, Inc. is excited to announce it is expanding its Virtual Research Mission audience by teaming with Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network!

FBWhaleTimeGrayWhales ONLY USE WITH AQ OR DO NOT SHARE Or use for programWhaleTimes has taken k-7 kids to research sites in Antarctica, California, and the deep sea through our Virtual Research Mission program…and now Oregon Coast is joining us on our next adventures with gray whales and the deep sea!

Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network (ON) connects young people to science and nature using technology as a bridge. Launched early last year, ON is a free educational resource which allows teachers to build online student communities, facilitate inquiry-based science in their classrooms, and access a variety of natural history resources about the ocean, its species, ecosystems and conservation concerns. Continue reading

Welcome Girl Scouts!

Go Gray Whales! Go Girl Scouts!

Exciting news!  The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington are joining us for Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation! We know these amazing young women will take their enthusiasm and love of whales and share it with others to protect our seas! We know their insightful questions will keep our Science Team from the Southwest Fisheries Science Center on their toes!

Here’s the announcement from The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington :

April 20- May 1, 2015 Daisy- Ambassador (age appropriate materials)

Are you interested in the ocean and the beautiful creatures that dwell within? Did you know that a gray whale is 45 ft long – that’s longer than a school bus! (A newborn calf is as long as a Jeep!) Have you ever wondered what it would be like to know more about whales, or follow them on their fantastic journey as they travel through the seas? Join WhaleTimes for their Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation Virtual Research Mission and be connected with scientists that do this very thing, and get first-hand insider knowledge of the whales,  their habits and movements. You can see photos, interact with scientists, ask questions and get answers in this digital pen-pal style event no matter where you live! Interested?

Girl Scouts can be any age level (Daisy- Ambassador) and live in any location in our council and still experience this unique opportunity! Spaces are limited so sign up today!

Council Wide FREE

Have questions or want to sign up? Troop leaders contact WhaleTimes graywhales2015@whaletimes.org  (You can sign up as an individual troop member, but you must have your parent/guardian contact us.)

Go Gray Whales! Go Girl Scouts!

Invite gray whale experts into your classroom!

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Gray Whale: Celebration of Conservation Poster

Be part of WhaleTimes next Virtual Research Mission…

Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation

Students connect with Southwest Fisheries Science Center-NOAA (SWFSC) biologists at the Piedras Blancas (California) field station. This is the third year SWFSC scientists have invited classrooms ‘into’ the gray whale research station. Students learn about the importance of monitoring and counting mother-calf pairs, photo identification of individual whales, and more.

Mission Date: April 20 to May 1, 2015

To register or find out about classroom scholarships contact: graywhales2015 this URL