Video: Whale Behaviors

Hello Virtual Science Team Members!

The team at Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network has created an excellent video about whale behaviors for you. This installment of Oceanscape Network’s Science in Seconds provides footage of common whale behaviors you can observe from the water’s surface, whether you’re on a boat or watching whales from shore. Enjoy!

Thanks Oceanscape! And, Virtual Science Team Members, don’t forget to visit the Oceanscape Network at: oceanscape.aquarium.org

Jake, the SeaDog

WhaleTimes

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Baleen and Toothed Whales

Our Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation Mission is under way!

A gray whale is a baleen whale. A killer whale is a toothed whale. What’s the difference? This installment of Oceanscape Network’s Science in Seconds provides footage and information about the differences between baleen and toothed whales. Enjoy!

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The gray whales are here!!!

Courtesy NOAA Email#3 Spyhopping calfsmGray Whales: Celebration of Conservation is here!

More than 500 kids splashed down at the Piedras Blancas Field Station today to become part of the gray whale research with the amazing Dave Weller, Wayne Perryman and the rest of the Science Team from Southwest Fisheries Science Center/NOAA. The folks at the Oregon Coast Aquarium Oceanscape Network and the Rangers from the Depoe Bay Whale Center in Oregon are also joining us!

You can join us, too. Go to the Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation tab at the top of this page and a drop down menu will appear. We’ll post the scientists and rangers blogs and also provide links to Oceanscape’s whale videos and other activities.

Click here to read the welcome letter.

 

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News from Dudley: Whale sharks

Whale Shark WhaleTimes Courtesy NOAA wbsmHi Kids,

This is one of my friends, a whale shark. Whale sharks are the largest fish in the sea and, as you can see, also one of the most beautiful. Whale sharks grow to reach 40 feet or more! Maybe as big as 65 feet long! Their average weight is about 40,000 pounds. That’s about the weight of 10 cars!

Its white spots and pale vertical and horizontal stripes make it easy to identify. They have a flattened head with a blunt snout and a giant mouth. According to EVERYTHING SHARKS (National Geographic Kids, 2011) it’s mouth is almost as wide as a car! Wow!

Don’t worry, this gorgeous giant is only interested in eating plankton (tiny plants and animals).

Like many shark species, whale sharks need our help.  The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) lists whales sharks as vulnerable mostly due to overfishing.

See you later,

Dudley

PS. Remember to join us for Fintastic Friday: Giving Sharks a Voice on May 8, 2015 to celebrate sharks!

Gray Whales…arriving soon!

Join WhaleTimes, Southwest Fisheries Science Center/NOAA and the Oceanscape Network, for Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation, a Virtual Research Mission that connects gray whale biologists with students, teachers, and the public. This event runs April 20 to May 1, 2015.

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