Welcome Girl Scouts!

Go Gray Whales! Go Girl Scouts!

Exciting news!  The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington are joining us for Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation! We know these amazing young women will take their enthusiasm and love of whales and share it with others to protect our seas! We know their insightful questions will keep our Science Team from the Southwest Fisheries Science Center on their toes!

Here’s the announcement from The Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington :

April 20- May 1, 2015 Daisy- Ambassador (age appropriate materials)

Are you interested in the ocean and the beautiful creatures that dwell within? Did you know that a gray whale is 45 ft long – that’s longer than a school bus! (A newborn calf is as long as a Jeep!) Have you ever wondered what it would be like to know more about whales, or follow them on their fantastic journey as they travel through the seas? Join WhaleTimes for their Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation Virtual Research Mission and be connected with scientists that do this very thing, and get first-hand insider knowledge of the whales,  their habits and movements. You can see photos, interact with scientists, ask questions and get answers in this digital pen-pal style event no matter where you live! Interested?

Girl Scouts can be any age level (Daisy- Ambassador) and live in any location in our council and still experience this unique opportunity! Spaces are limited so sign up today!

Council Wide FREE

Have questions or want to sign up? Troop leaders contact WhaleTimes graywhales2015@whaletimes.org  (You can sign up as an individual troop member, but you must have your parent/guardian contact us.)

Go Gray Whales! Go Girl Scouts!

Meet Amazing Animals and Awesome Scientists in the Deep Sea

Creep into the Deep

Strawberry Squid Copyright T Frank WhaleTimes wblrg

Animals dressed in red velvet, some as transparent as glass, and others that flash and ripple with light so bright they could light a room. Every animal and discovery in the deep is weirder and more wonderful than the next. Only 5% of the ocean has been explored. In order to protect the ocean, there is so much more we must learn. Join us on a mission to investigate how the cool creatures that creep in the deep survive!

Take your STEM curriculum to new depths by participating in Creep into the Deep, WhaleTimes’ original Virtual Research Mission.

For grades 3-6. Teachers, ENROLL TODAY! Space is limited.

Two Creep into the Deep  Missions available:

Mission #1:  July 19-24, 2015
Research Project: Vision and Bioluminescence in the Deep-sea Benthos II

Mission #2: September 21-31, 2015
Research Project: Deep-Pelagic Nekton Dynamics of the Gulf of Mexico

For more information visit our Creep into the Deep page or contact us at: creepintothedeep2015@ this URL

Invite gray whale experts into your classroom!

Gray whale poster weblg

Gray Whale: Celebration of Conservation Poster

Be part of WhaleTimes next Virtual Research Mission…

Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation

Students connect with Southwest Fisheries Science Center-NOAA (SWFSC) biologists at the Piedras Blancas (California) field station. This is the third year SWFSC scientists have invited classrooms ‘into’ the gray whale research station. Students learn about the importance of monitoring and counting mother-calf pairs, photo identification of individual whales, and more.

Mission Date: April 20 to May 1, 2015

To register or find out about classroom scholarships contact: graywhales2015 this URL

A little more about Walruses

Tusks and whiskers on a young walrus

Tusks and whiskers on a young walrus

Hi Kids,

A couple of you asked about my tusks. Handsome, aren’t they? My tusks are extra long canine teeth. Some day, they’ll be super long!

Walrus tusks can grow up to 3 feet and weigh as much as 12 pounds! That’s the weight of a small turkey! (so I’ve heard, we don’t have those in the Arctic.) Female walrus’ have tusks, too.

My tusks help determine my rank in the herd, that and my body size and how tough or aggressive I am. I also use them to pull myself out of the water, to break holes in the ice from below and to defend myself against other male walrus’ or even a polar bear.

That’s it for now. See you later.

Dudley

Dudley here!

Hi Kids,  my name’s Dudley, I’m a friend of Jake, the SeaDog™. She asked me to join the WhaleTimes Team. Walrus Courtesy  NOAA WhaleTimes websm

I’m a walrus.  I’m a big guy.  I weight about 1,700 lbs and I’m 7.25 feet long. Some of my friends are even bigger reaching 11.5 feet long.  I love to eat. My favorite food…clams. I could eat a ton of them.

Like you, I love the ocean. I will be sharing interesting stories, facts, and fun activities Jake and I discover along the way.

That’s a little about me. I’ll be stopping by WhaleTimes  to give you more about myself and about other animals of the sea.  See you later!

Dudley

Dr. Dean Grubbs shows off “Big as Life” Thank You for Fintastic Friday!!!

A six gill shark takes a selfie in the deep

A six gill shark takes a selfie in the deep

Recently, WhaleTimes Director Ruth Musgrave was invited to visit elementary schools in Oregon City, Oregon to talk about sharks. She discovered the kids in Oregon City LOVE sharks as much as we do.
The kids were inspired to celebrate Fintastic Friday early and send a “Big as Life” thank you to biologists helping sharks.
If you follow the link below you’ll see Dr. Dean Grubbs, Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory, showing off his thank you!Take a look! https://www.facebook.com/FSUCML

Thank you kids — and Dr. Grubbs and our friends at Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory! Together we can save sharks!

Don’t forget to mark your calendar, Fintastic Friday: Giving Sharks, Skates, and Rays a Voice is just months away.

Oh Baby! Gray Whale Calves Galore

Gray whale and calf swimming north.

Gray whale and calf swimming north.

In 2014, researchers counted 431 newborn gray whale calves. The story of the eastern gray whales, from endangered to thriving, is a beacon of hope for other conservation efforts.

Once nearly extinct, conservation efforts lead to the eastern Pacific gray whale population rebounding and its eventual removal from the endangered species list in 1994. Today, about 20,000 of these bus-sized beauties thrive along the Pacific Coast of North America. That’s a definite cause for celebration!

Join us in April to follow gray whale moms and newborn calves heading north to their feeding grounds.

WhaleTimes’  Gray Whales: Celebration of Conservation highlights the astounding success of the gray whale recovery and current research to monitor the gray whale population.

Teachers…enroll today! This program is free to schools, but has limited space. Find out more. Contact us at:  graywhales2015 this URL.