Six-gill Shark

Hi Everyone,

Meet a gorgeous shark, the six-gill shark. This is a deep-water shark and as you can guess from the name, it has six gill slits. Those are the openings the water goes out after it passes over the gills.   Most other sharks have 5 gill slits. A couple have 7.

The six-gill shark’s relatives date back over 200 million years. It has a heavy and powerful body with a round blunt snout. A six-gill shark’s color ranges from tan, brown, gray and even to black. Six-gills grow up to 18 feet (5.5 meters) long.  That’s longer than a utility vehicle. Female six-gill sharks are larger then the males.

Another way six-gill sharks differ from other sharks is that its dorsal fin. It only has one (which isn’t unusual) but the one dorsal fin is located further back near the tail. Other dorsal fin of other sharks is usually near the center of their body (on their backs, of course).

Like the prickly shark, the six-gill might appear slow and sluggish when caught on film by an ROV or the very cool “Eye-in-the-Sea” camera. But hey, how would we look sitting on the couch texting friends or binge watching your favorite show? In between meals, a six-gill doesn’t waste energy zooming around the sea. When hunting, though, six-gills  burst into action. They ambush prey from a close range. Six-gills eat small fishes, snails, crabs, shrimp, and squid.

Because of its deep-sea lifestyle, little is know about its reproductive behavior or other behaviors.

Six-gill sharks are threatened due to being overfished and caught in nets set for other species.

See you next time,
Dudley

Thank you to all our summer camps and Science Teams!

Wow, it has been the fastest summer yet! Kindergarten to 8th grade kids from across the country participated in two WhaleTimes’ virtual research missions. They danced to DNA, made vaquita wind socks, and created elephant seal tags. The kids also dazzled the Science Team members with their knowledge and challenged them with thought-provoking questions during the 30+ Skype™ sessions.

Our Creep into the DEEPEND Summer Camp program took kids to the deep sea in the Gulf of Mexico with the DEEPEND Science Team. They met cool animals and even cooler research and researchers while discovering  DEEPEND Consortium’s important deep-sea research.

Kids joined Patrick W. Robinson,  Dave Weller, Barbara Taylor,  Daniel Costa and their Science Teams from the UC-Santa Cruz, Costa Lab, UC Año Nuevo Island Reserve and Southwest Fisheries Science Center/NOAA (vaquita and gray whale research) as part of our Celebration of Conservation: Gray Whales, Elephant Seals, and Vaquita. Summer camp kids learned about the beautiful gray whale, the amazing elephant seal, and the shy vaquita. The kids heard the successful conservation stories of the elephant seal and gray whale. Conservation efforts that saved both species from extinction. Summer campers also learned that the vaquita’s conservation story is still being written. With less than 30 vaquita left, we don’t know if it’ll have a happy ending or not.

Through both WhaleTimes’ programs our summer camp kids learned two important lessons. 1) Everybody makes a difference when it comes to conservation; 2) Everyone can help save ocean animals by only buying and/or eating sustainably caught seafood (when you are hankering for seafood).

Thank you to our Science Team Members, volunteers, and the museums and science centers for making it another amazing summer!

  • DEEPEND Research and Creep into the DEEPEND program funded by funded by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GOMRI) award number GOMRI2014-IV-914
  • The Celebration of Conservation Elephant Seal Team’s research funded in part by: The Office of Naval Research, Joint Industry Program, Año Nuevo Reserve; gray whale and vaquita research supported by Southwest Fisheries Science Center, NOAA Fisheries. The education program portion funded by WhaleTimes and supported by volunteer time and effort from the Science Teams themselves and WhaleTimes’ volunteers.

Thank you to our museum and science centers for letting us make a splash at your summer camps!

If you missed your chance to join us at a summer camp near you, the program will be back next year.

   

7-12th graders, learn about shark research with our friends at the Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network

Learn about shark tracking research by joining our friends at the  Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network (ON) from August 28 to September 1, 2017, for “Tracking Sharks on the Great Barrier Reef.” The feature will highlight the research of Dr. Michelle Heupel, a pioneer in the acoustic tracking of sharks and rays. Dr. Heupel’s studies on the movements of large predators are helping Australian scientists create better management plans to protect these often imperiled species, while assessing how changing ocean conditions are affecting their life-cycles. The program is free and will consist of daily blogs, videos, downloadable items and more. This program is hosted exclusively on the Oceanscape Network website.

You can also read more about the Dr. Michelle Heupel  and shark conservation efforts in MISSION SHARK RESCUE (National Geographic Children’s Books, 2016 / ISBN-13: 978-1426320903)

 

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Vaquita Update June 2017: Next Step

Fifty vaquitas left, no, thirty, wait…seven more found dead in the last few months. The news is bleak for vaquitas as the population continues to decline.

A vaquita is a porpoise and the most endangered whale  in the world. Less than 30 survive.

Efforts to stop illegal fishing of the (critically endangered) totoaba and use of gillnets has been at the forefront of scientists and the Mexican Government. Unfortunately, vaquitas (and totoabas) continue to die. With the latest CIRVA report, scientists now believe the only way to save vaquita from extinction is to try to capture the porpoises and put them in safety away from gillnets. “The Mexican government and its conservation partners have organized a live capture effort to try to save the vaquita from extinction….” Read more in this Vaquita Update (courtesy of the Oregon Coast Aquarium.

When you eat seafood, and only eat or buy sustainable seafood.  Find out how: What is Sustainable?

Are you doing everything you can to protect the ocean? Take the 30 Days to a Sustainable You Survey and find out.

The power to protect ocean animals like the vaquita is in your hands.

 

Celebration of Conservation SUMMER CAMPS!

NEW! Celebration of Conservation Summer Camps.  This summer, museums and science centers throughout the country will offer WhaleTimes’ Celebration of Conservation: Gray Whales, Elephants Seals, and Vaquita Summer Camps. 

Our  Celebration of Conservation highlights three important marine conservation stories – two successful stories and one still being written.  As part of TEAM VAQUITA, students learn about gray whales, elephant seals, and vaquita.  Gray whales and elephant seals were once so close extinction it’s amazing either species survived. Due to protection efforts and public awareness, both species are thriving. Both have been delisted (removed) from the endangered species list.  Vaquita, a kind of porpoise, needs that same kind of happy ending. It is the most endangered whale in the world. There are only 30 vaquita left in the world.

To register or find out more, check out the list below and contact the museum or science center near you.

Adventure Science Center Nashville, Tennessee
Catawba Science Center Hickory, North Carolina
Liberty Science Center Jersey City, New Jersey
Maine Discovery Museum Bangor, Maine
Museum of Discovery and Science Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network Newport, Oregon
Pacific Science Center Seattle, WA
St. Louis Science Center St. Louis, Missouri
Tallahassee Museum Tallahassee, Florida
Univ of Michigan Museum of Natural History Ann Arbor, Michigan
Museum of Discovery and Science Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

 

     

DEEPEND at GoMOSES, New Orleans

In February, WhaleTimes Director Ruth Musgrave joined the DEEPEND Science Team at the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Ecosystem (GoMOSES) annual conference in New Orleans. Several members of the DEEPEND Science Team presented their research through talks, papers, and posters. After the conference concluded, the Team met for their annual all-hands meeting.

Our annual DEEPEND meetings are a fast-paced day when Science Team members shares their latest research and plans. Groups worked together to discuss the research and next steps. Watching the scientists collaborate was an amazing time to see the scientific process in action.  So much news. Keep up with the DEEPEND Science Team members and find out more about the latest news at: deependconsortium.org.

 

 

Creep into the DEEPEND Summer Camps!

Creep into the DEEPEND Summer Camps are back!  This summer, Creep into the DEEPEND Summer Camps are offered throughout the country for k-8th grade. To register or find out more, check out the list below and contact the museum or science center near you.

Catawba Science Center Hickory, North Carolina
Liberty Science Center Jersey City, New Jersey
Maine Discovery Museum Bangor, Maine
Museum of Discovery and Science Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network Newport, Oregon
Pacific Science Center Seattle, WA
St. Louis Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri
Tallahassee Museum Tallahassee, Florida
Univ of Michigan Museum of Natural History Ann Arbor, Michigan

For more information, email us: deepend at our website whaletimes.org

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Vaquita video

Year of the Vaquita 2017

This 60 second video created by Oregon Coast Aquarium, part of TEAM VAQUITA, will quickly introduce you to the vaquita and the challenges being addressed by the Year of the Vaquita.

6-12th grade teachers, looking for vaquita-related activities and fact sheets for older students? Visit Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network.

K-5 Teachers, check out our Save the Vaquita K-5 fact sheets and activities. Better yet, enroll in our Celebration of Conservation program to learn more about vaquita, elephant seals, and gray whales.

Video courtesy of the Oregon Coast Aquarium’s Oceanscape Network

Sneak Peak at Save the Vaquita Curriculum

Here  is a sneak peak at two of our beautifully illustrated fact pages from our new Save the Vaquita k-5 Curriculum. Thank you to our talented illustrator Paul J. Lopez, for making the shy vaquita and totoaba stars! The curriculum is part of our Year of the Vaquita  program and  our Celebration of Conservation Virtual Research Mission 

Join TEAM VAQUITA and helps us raise awareness of vaquita,, totoaba, and how eating sustainable seafood can help save ocean animal.

 For more information on our Save the Vaquita program or if you are a teacher and would like to participate in our Celebration of Conservation program in March, contact us at   savethevaquita  at this URL

 

New Year’s Resolution – Save ocean animals — Eat sustainable seafood

whaletimes-vaquita-new-years-resolution-dec-2016414x640Happy 2017 from all of us at WhaleTimes.

WhaleTimes plans on celebrating the entire year, starting with celebrating 2017 The Year of the Vaquita. In March, we celebrate the first ever Save the Vaquita Month.

This spring and this summer we’re planning our Celebration of Conservation: Gray Whales, Elephant Seals, and Vaquita programs. Classrooms and museum and science center summer camps throughout the country will join TEAM VAQUITA to help us support scientists and the Mexican government to save vaquita and other ocean animals.

Celebrate 2017 by only eating sustainably caught seafood.
Happy New Year!

 

 

 

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